Degree aspirations are an important factor among those who decide not to join Community Colleges Inside the Higher Ed.


Community college students who enrolled in the fall were more likely to want to get a four-year degree than those who either considered or enrolled in the fall but decided not to do so in the fall, according to a examination of New America.

The survey of 1,696 adults from the progressive think tank showed that 43 percent of the students who enrolled last spring and continued to enroll in the fall were interested in getting a four-year degree or more. Forty-five percent of those who considered enrolling in the spring but enrolled in the fall were interested in earning a degree, the survey found.

By comparison, a smaller percentage of students who did not enroll in the fall were interested in a degree. Only 20 percent of those enrolled in the spring who decided not to enroll in the fall wanted to earn a degree, as well as only 28 percent of those who considered enrolling in the spring, but neither then nor in the fall.

Among the other findings of the study, financial distress during the pandemic was an important factor in students’ decisions not to enroll in the fall. Of those who had attended in the spring but not in the fall, 41 percent said they had to work and 38 percent said they could no longer afford their program. Among those who had considered enrolling in the spring but did not enroll in the fall, 47 percent cited uncertainty about the pandemic, 44 percent said they could no longer afford a program, and 37 percent said they had to working.



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